RUNNING STITCH

From the knot to knot, let’s do it right from zero.

This is the origin of embroidery culture over the world, such as Kantha in India, Boro and Sashiko in Japan.

It is used in hand-sewing and tailoring to sew basic seams, in hand patchwork to assemble pieces, I suggest 3-4mm width per stitch.

 

For example:

1. Patchwork

2. Edge finishing, normally 1 cm for the seam allowance

3. Combining fabric panels

However, if you want to strongly and permanently attach two pieces of fabric, you have to use back stitch.

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BACK STITCH

Back stitch is a class of embroidery and sewing stitches. 

 

1. In hand sewing, it is a utility stitch which strongly and permanently attaches two pieces of fabric.

2. In embroidery, these stitches form lines and are most often used to outline shapes and details.

3. It is also used to embroider lettering.

HIDDEN STITCH

Hidden or blind stitching hides stitching under folded edges. It is a method of joining two pieces of fabric so that the stitch thread is invisible.

 

  1. Best use for directly attaching pieces of fabric on the outside 

  2. Blind hem stitches are almost completely hidden on both sides  of the garments. (Turn inwards as the picture of running stitch) To be completely hidden on the front of the garment, each time the needle is pulled through only a 2-3 threads of the fabric, which means that the majority of the stitching is hidden inside the hem.

COVER A BUTTON

Leaving 3mm for seam allowance, apply running stitches along

a piece of circle fabric that is cut in bias. 

Pull the thread tight and end up with a knot. 

Cover the old buttons with the fabric you like. The diameter is about twice the diameter of the button plus its height.

 

*Wrapping the button with a piece of wet fabric

could get a better effect for the non-stretched fabric.

HANDWORKED BUTTONHOLE

It is convenient to use machine, but the perfection of a handworked buttonhole is something else. It’s an irreplaceable beauty.

Hand-sewn buttonholes require that the slit is carefully cut first, after which a dense blanket stitch is applied to clean finish its raw edges. 

 

You can also apply blanket stitch to reinforce or decorate any kind of edges.

DARNING STITCH

 

Recently there’s been a renaissance around “visible mending’.

Darning is usually applied on the knees, socks, jeans and jumpers.....Visible mending allows it to become part of the history of a cherished garment, with the stitching done in contrasting colours rather than merely being sewn in matching threads

to pretend nothing happened.

 

Darning stitch is a simple running stitch in which the thread is "woven" in rows along the grain of the fabric, with the stitching reversing direction at the end of each row, and then filling in the framework thus created, as if weaving.

 

Extending the running stitches outside the damaged area helps holding the lines straight and tight.

NEEDLE FELTING

Needle felting is a super quick and easy method of repairing holes in knitwear or fabric.

Grab a needle felting tool plus a mat, spread the wool felt evenly, then start to stab away. Carefully adjust the shape and the thickness, and finally clean finish the edge.

Watch out for the needle, don't put your finger too close to it!

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT! KEEP GOING!

SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL MY COMPANIONS FOR UPCYCLING IN HONG KONG

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